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the disquiet of him who lacks an adversary: a self-portrait. · What Is This? · Who Is This? · Essays
simply-divine-creation:

simply-divine-creation:

Isaiah 43:18-19 Forget the former things; do not dwell on the past. See I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland.

simply-divine-creation:

simply-divine-creation:

Isaiah 43:18-19 Forget the former things; do not dwell on the past. See I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland.

(via wizzard890)

(Source: pyravid, via cyborges)

printeresting:

printclubboston: We are thrilled to announce that Print Club Boston prints are going to be stocked at the newly established Print Workers Barcelona.

codenumbertwo:

#architectureofdoom #akureyri #iceland

codenumbertwo:

#architectureofdoom #akureyri #iceland

(via architectureofdoom)

illegallydownloaded:

"While the world he inhabits is, in some respects, counterfeit, there’s nothing fake about Truman himself. No scripts, no cue cards. It isn’t always Shakespeare, but it’s genuine. It’s a life.”

 The Truman Show (1998) dir. Peter Weir

(Source: alienmovies, via hospitaltown)

cross-connect:

Anne Agee

Ann Agee is an American visual artist who works mainly in ceramics, often reappropriating traditional designs such as blue-and-white patterns. Her works include ceramic murals, an entire ceramic bathroom, and ceramic sex toys. She was a 2011 Guggenheim Fellow.

She gained a BFA at Cooper Union School of Art in 1981 and an MFA from Yale University in 1986. She first came to fame in the Bad Girls show at the New Museum, New York in 1994.

Her work is in the collections of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Rhode Island School of Design Museum; and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

(via artthugs)

(Source: maopin, via akaashikeijis)

cubebreaker:

To commemorate each British and Colonial soldier lost during WWI, Paul Cummins and Tom Piper installed 888,246 ceramic blood red poppies flowing from the Tower of London for a project entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red.

(via anfielding)

yudoku:

2014年 桜 by ebiyuka

(Source: yudoku, via englishsnow)

amoying:

Chvrches // Do I Wanna Know (Arctic Monkeys)

(via saltinies)

oldfilmsflicker:

Book-Cut Artworks by Thomas Allen

via fer1972

SO COOL

(via theparadigmshifts)

lostsplendor:

United Kingdom c. 1937 via Imgur

lostsplendor:

United Kingdom c. 1937 via Imgur

(via colonial-abroad)

The Minack Theatre

cantankerousquince:

This is the Minack Theatre:

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It can be found at Porthcurno in Cornwall (<3) so it’s waaaay down at the bottom of England. 

"Minack" in Cornish, a language sadly long dead but kind of reviving …. it’s complicated, means "a rocky place" which fits this theatre beautifully. 

It was built (and by built I don’t just mean paid for) by an awesome lady called Rowena Cade.

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Admittedly she is not ‘technically’ Cornish, having been born in Derbyshire, but for what she did for the county definitely makes her one of us. 

She moved down to Cornwall after the first world war and bought a piece of headland for £100 on which she built a house. 

The year is 1929 and Rowena and her family take on the task of performing an open air Midsummer Night’s Dream in a meadow. The show was so popular that they went back to it again a year later. 

Following this, it was suggested that The Tempest would be a play that work wonderfully with the coastal backdrop. Cade apparently was willing to donate her garden but felt that getting an audience in there would be tricky. So instead she turned her sights onto the gully above Minack Rock.

It took six months over a particularly cruel winter for Cade and two good ol’ Cornish lads to get a rough semblance of a stage and auditorium but in 1932, The Minack saw its first performance of The Tempest.

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Rowena didn’t stop here. She could imagine something even better. So she began slowly cutting and shaping granite by hand to create her vision. The work continued for the next seven years but with the outbreak of another War meant that the cliff had to be cleared for defence reasons and her work was lost. 

Undeterred, she began again. By the 1950s she and her gardener, Billy Rawlings had not only built a theatre but also a car park, access road and a 90 step stairway from the beach. When Rawlings passed away in 1966, she inscribed the only granite seat in his memory. 

The Minack Theatre’s auditorium displays its theatrical history in its very rock. Cade, using the tip of a screwdriver, would write the name and dates of productions into the cement before it dried. 

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Shakespeare is somewhat of a speciality for the Minack - Cade loved the Bard and the backdrop provides a stunning setting for any production. This theatre really is a treasure for us Cornish and if you ever have the chance to go even just to see the architecture, do. It’s a very special place.

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(via smokeandsong)